Greetings!  Once again, I am proud to bring you an article by a guest author who has lots of experience working for the benefit of non-profit organizations.  John Haydon (pictured at left) is the man behind JohnHaydon.com and InboundZombie, which is the site for his social media consulting business.  

John specializes in helping non-profits “increase awareness, amplify engagement, and get more donations online.”  I think those are goals that most non-profits would aim for!

John has also written an e-book, called “The Complete Facebook Guide For Small Nonprofits”, which is free to download, if you “Like”  his Facebook page.

I hope you enjoy this article and I encourage you to check out John’s site when you get the chance.  I’m sure you will learn something and have a good time doing it!  Thanks, John!

7 ways Facebook’s Subscribe Button can be a nonprofit game-changer

facebook logo2 7 ways Facebooks Subscribe Button can be a nonprofit game changer

Up until now there has been no way for the leaders within your nonprofit to join discussions about your cause on Facebook, unless they were willing to compromise their privacy. But now with the Subscribe Button, Facebook users can opt-in to their public updates without being her friend.

1. Multiply the number of organizational touch points on Facebook

The Facebook experience is essentially a personal one. If given the choice, your fans would rather connect with the people they already know and respect in your organization.

One way to give them what they want, is to select a handful of these respected employees to be spokespeople for your cause on Facebook. Once you’ve selected these folks, you can add them as featured admins on your Facebook Page displayed in the left-hand sidebar (see below).

admin panel featured 7 ways Facebooks Subscribe Button can be a nonprofit game changer

You could also create a custom tab called “Our People” with a two-sentence bio for each spokesperson and a link to their Profile.

2. Enhance relationships with your Facebook fans

One way to think about the strategy mentioned in #2 is to remember thatyour brand is ultimately your people. They’re your brand at events, and on the telephone. So why wouldn’t they be your brand on Facebook?

By putting multiple spokespeople on the Facebook front lines, you’re giving your supporters more human ways to connect with your organization. Quantity and quality.

3. Segment communication channels

It gets really interesting if you have leaders within a specific focus areas. For example, UNICEF might promote spokespeople based on the countries they serve. This way, a donor who consistently supports the organization in Ghana can subscribe to updates from that UNICEF spokesperson.

4. Identify top supporters

subscribers tab 7 ways Facebooks Subscribe Button can be a nonprofit game changer

When a Facebook users subscribes to public updates from an executive director at a nonprofit, they have more than just a passing interest. They have more interest in your organization then your average Facebook fan. You can identify these folks by clicking on the “Subscribers” button on your spokesperson’s profile.

5. Enhance brand transparency

It goes without saying that having a handful of Facebook spokespeople designated to connect with constituents says a lot about how open the organization is. Obviously you’ll want to create guidelines for these spokespeople so that it’s easier for them to know what share and what not to share.

6. Enhance your organization’s search profile

Public updates on a Facebook profile enhance to your organization’s ability to appear in search results. Imagine the National Wildlife Federationpetition to fight global warming showing up in Google more often because their key evangelists are posting public updates about why they care.

7. Increase your Facebook Page fanbase

maris pages 7 ways Facebooks Subscribe Button can be a nonprofit game changer

When you feature Page owners on your Facebook Page sidebar, the Page is also displayed on each admins Profile. This creates more opportunities for Facebook users to be introduced to your Facebook Page.

That’s all I got for now… Just a few ideas from a guy with a laptop.

What do you think?

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Posted on 28 September 2011

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1 Comments For This Post

  1. John Haydon says:

    A note to readers: “The Complete Facebook Guide For Small Nonprofits” is undergoing a major re-write… :-)


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